Saturday, September 29, 2018

Health Benefits and Side Effects of eating Chicken | The Ultimate Beginner's Guide - Health and Fitness City




Health Benefits and Side Effects of eating Chicken

Chicken is the most common type of poultry in the world. Owing to the relative ease and low cost of raising them in comparison to animals
such as cattle or hogs, chickens have become prevalent throughout the cuisine of cultures around the world, and their meat has been variously adapted to regional tastes.


Helath Benefits of Chicken

1. High in Protein
If you’re looking for a great source of lean, low fat protein, this bird is the word. The protein in chicken lends itself to muscle growth and development, and help support a healthy body weight and aid weight loss.

2. Natural Anti-depressant
Chicken, like its brother fowl the turkey, is high in an amino acid called tryptophan, which gives you that comforting feeling after consuming a big bowl of mom’s chicken soup. In fact, if you’re feeling depressed, eating some poultry will increase the serotonin levels in your brain, enhance your mood, blasting stress, and lulling you to sleep.

3. Prevents Bone Loss
If you’re entering your senior years and you’re concerned about Osteoporosis or arthritis, eating chicken will aid in your fight against bone loss thanks to the protein punch it packs!

4. Poultry for Heart Health
Homocysteine is an amino acid that can cause cardiovascular disease if levels are high in the body. Fortunately for us, eating chicken breast suppresses and controls homocysteine levels.

5. Plenty of Phosphorus
Chicken is also rich in phosphorus, an essential mineral that supports your teeth and bones, as well as kidney, liver, and central nervous system function.

6. Seeking Selenium?
Chicken also abundant in selenium, an essential mineral involved in metabolic performance—in other words thyroid, hormone, metabolism, and immune function.

7. Metabolism Booster
Vitamin B6 (or B-complex vitamins) encourage enzymes and metabolic cellular reactions (or a process known as Methylation), which means eating this bird will keep blood vessels healthy, energy levels high, and metabolism burning calories so you can manage a healthy weight and activity level.8. Rich in Niacin
Chicken also happens to be rich in niacin, one particular B-vitamin that guards against cancer and other forms of genetic (DNA) damage.

9. Promotes Eye Health
Chicken is high in retinol, alpha and beta-carotene, and lycopene, all derived from vitamin A, and all vital for healthy eyesight.

10. Essential for Healthy Tissue Growth
Many of us are plagued with chapped lips, cracked mouths, tongue sores, or dry skin in winter. However, a boost in riboflavin (or Vitamin B2), found in chicken livers, will drastically reduce your skin problems and repair dry or damaged skin.


Side Effects of Chicken

1. Food Poisoning From Broiler Chicken
Food poisoning from Salmonella, Campylobacter spp., and other bacteria and germs in chicken remains a very real possibility. The United States has the highest per capita consumption of chicken in the world. And 1 in 6 Americans has at least one bout of food poisoning or contracts food-borne illnesses every year.

2. Risk Of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacterial Infection From Broiler Chicken
Antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria are a problem that the medical community is still grappling with. And mass-produced broiler chicken isn’t helping the cause. The widespread use of antibiotics given to chickens to help keep off infections is adding to this problem.

3. High Cholesterol Content In Chicken Meat Even Without Skin
Yes, chicken eaten without the skin on may have less cholesterol than a similar portion of lamb or veal. But it isn’t the lowest on the cholesterol charts as compared to all other types of meat.

Beef sirloin and chicken are nearly the same as far as cholesterol levels are concerned. While beef sirloin packs in about 89 mg of cholesterol in a 3.5 oz portion, a similar serving of chicken without skin has about 85 mg.

4. Risk Of Cancer From Deep Fried Or Grilled Chicken
Research indicates a reduced risk of cancer, by as much as 40%, in vegetarians when compared to meat eaters. Why? Because consuming a diet that’s very high on animal protein and low on fruit and vegetables could up your risk of cancer. So no matter how lean the chicken is or how well you prepare it, if you skip your vegetables to make room for more chicken, you could be setting yourself up for a fall.

So chicken, previously considered less harmful, could be just as problematic if cooked incorrectly.

5. Risk Of Arsenic Exposure From Chicken Feed
Arsenic is increasingly being made a part of chicken feed, mainly to ward off diarrhea, improve pigmentation, and help ensure good growth in chickens. However, with an increased risk of heart disease, diabetes, neurological problems, and even cancer due to arsenic exposure in humans, it may be good to know what you’re eating.

Research has found that as much as 55% of uncooked chicken products sampled from supermarkets contained arsenic. All of the tested fast-food chicken contained some arsenic. But organic brands mostly contained lesser amounts than regular brands.



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