Thursday, September 27, 2018

What Is Glutamine, Dosage, Safety and Side Effects | The Ultimate Beginner's Guide - Health and Fitness City




What Is Glutamine?

Glutamine is an amino acid (a building block for proteins), found naturally in the body. Glutamine is used to counter some of the side effects of
medical treatments. For example, it is used for side effects of cancerchemotherapy including diarrhea, pain and swelling inside the mouth (mucositis), nerve pain (neuropathy), and muscle and joint pains caused by the cancer drug Taxol. Glutamine is also used to protect the immune system and digestive system in people undergoing radiochemotherapy for cancer of the esophagus. Additionally, glutamine is used for improving recovery after bone marrow transplant or bowel surgery, increasing well-being in people who have suffered traumatic injuries, and preventing infections in critically ill people.

Some people use glutamine for digestive system conditions such as stomach ulcers, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn's disease. It is also used for depression, moodiness, irritability, anxiety, insomnia, and enhancing exercise performance.

People who have HIV (AIDS) sometimes use glutamine to prevent weight loss (HIV wasting).

Glutamine is also used for attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a urinary condition called cystinuria, sickle cell anemia, and for alcohol withdrawal support.

Glutamine powder can be ordered through most wholesale drug suppliers. Glutamine for commercial use is made by a fermentation process using bacteria that produce glutamine.


Effects on Muscle Gain and Exercise Performance

Due to its role as a building block of protein, some researchers have tested whether taking glutamine as a supplement improves muscle gain or exercise performance.

In one study, 31 people took either glutamine or a placebo during six weeks of weight training.

By the end of the study, both groups showed improved muscle mass and strength. However, there were no differences between the two groups.

Additional studies have also shown that it has no effects on muscle mass or performance.

However, some research has reported that glutamine supplements may decrease muscle soreness and improve recovery after intense exercise.

In fact, one study found that glutamine or glutamine plus carbohydrates can help reduce a blood marker of fatigue during two hours of running.

It has also been used to try to boost the immune function of athletes, but results vary.

Other research has found that it did not improve the recovery of carbohydrate stores (glycogen) in muscle when added to carbohydrates and certain amino acids.

In the end, there is no evidence that these supplements provide benefits for muscle gain or strength. There is some limited support for other effects, but more research is needed.

It’s also important to note that many athletes have high protein intakes in their regular diets, meaning they may be consuming large amounts of glutamine even without supplements.


Dosage, Safety and Side Effects

Since glutamine is an amino acid that is naturally produced in the body and found in many foods, there is no concern that it's harmful in normal quantities.

It has been estimated that a typical diet may contain 3 to 6 grams per day, although this amount could vary based on the types and quantities of foods consumed.

Studies on glutamine supplements have used a wide variety of doses, ranging from around 5 grams per day up to high doses of approximately 45 grams per day for six weeks.

Although no negative side effects were reported with this high dosage, blood safety markers were not specifically examined.

Other studies have reported minimal safety concerns regarding short-term supplementation of up to 14 grams per day.

Overall, it is believed that the short-term use of supplements is likely safe. However, some scientists have raised concerns about their sustained use.

Adding glutamine to a regular diet may cause a variety of changes in the way the body absorbs and processes amino acids. Yet, the long-term effects of these changes are unknown.

Therefore, more information is needed concerning long-term supplementation, particularly when high doses are used.

It is possible that glutamine supplements may not have the same effects if you eat an animal-based, high-protein diet, compared to a plant-based, lower-protein diet.

If you follow a plant-based diet with low glutamine content, you may be able to consume supplements while still receiving a normal daily amount of it overall.

If you decide to take a glutamine supplement, it is probably best to start with a conservative dose of around 5 grams per day.



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